Porting to consoles as an indie team

Porting to consoles as an indie team

You’ve been waiting for it, and it’s almost here: Mages of Mystralia is launching on consoles. Bringing Mages of Mystralia to PS4 and XBox One was a first in developing for consoles for most of the team, and we’re very proud to be part of this adventure. The official release date on PS4 was announced last week. Mark the day: August 22, 2017. Read more about it on PlayStation’s blog. The Xbox One version is in the final certification stages, we’ll confirm the release date soon.  For an indie studio, porting a game to consoles isn’t a small matter. Each platform has specific requirements and its own certification process. It’s also a huge challenge to work on porting to two consoles at once, especially considering the size of our team and the small number of programmers at Borealys – there’s only three. (Shout out to our technical team for their hard work and dedication!) This is why we couldn’t release the console versions at the same time as the PC one on Steam; we wanted to ensure that players got an optimized version for their favorite consoles. As much as technical requirements for consoles were a challenge for the team, we are extremely proud to bring an indie game to these new platforms. For those of you who don’t know, porting to consoles goes a little like this: Get a Dev Kit Make the game compatible with the new system Get approved for launch on console Debug, optimize, and debug again until the game meets the specific technical requirements for each system Send the game for certification on each...
Sofi Lamont-Cardinal our Game Designer

Sofi Lamont-Cardinal our Game Designer

Short presentation of yourself & what you do at Borealys Games? I joined the studio as a Game Designer a little more than a year ago, but I’ve been working in the video game industry for the last 9 years. I studied in Computer Science and Computation Arts at Concordia University and I later met Louis-Félix (CEO) and Patric (Game Director) when I was a student at L’Université de Montréal in Game Design. They were also students in this program at the time, but I only began working with them at Borealys. Since my arrival, I’ve done some level design work, but I’ve mainly dealt with Patric for the narrative design of the game and the logic behind the main and secondary quests. I’ve also had to be sure that what we’re doing matches the story of Mages of Mystralia’s author, Ed Greenwood. I had to write some additional dialogues and integrate all the texts. Part of my job is to make sure every character says the right thing at the right time. This makes it that it’s necessary for me to review the texts and make sure the players have enough information to advance in the game and understand the story without telling them too much. We want to add clues, but we don’t want the game to be too easy. There are some tasks I find  harder to do, like adding lines of small talk (optional dialogue in game) to the characters. That’s not my cup of tea in real life so it isn’t easy for me to write those types of dialogue. It can also be...
Antoine Vachon our Composer and Sound Designer

Antoine Vachon our Composer and Sound Designer

Short presentation of yourself & what you do at Borealys Games? I’m a composer. My main instrument is the piano, which I started playing when I was ten years old. I’m also the studio’s sound designer, which means that I’m in charge of creating all the sound effects as well as integrating, mixing and testing all the sound and music in the game. Previously, I was a sound engineer at CBC/Radio-Canada. I also worked for other video game companies, especially indie developers. I’ve also composed music for short films and visual performances. How do you find your inspiration? What are your influences? It may sound counterintuitive, but when I’m looking for inspiration for a project, I try to listen to music of completely different genres. For example, when I have to write orchestral music, like I’m doing for Mages of Mystralia, I listen to Rock, Electronic, Jazz music, etc. Emotions can be found in music of all genres, and seeking inspiration from different horizons helps me discover new things and stay creative. Lately, I’ve been listening a lot to the latest Bon Iver album. He’s an incredible artist, and his music is amazing. The latest album from M83 and Radiohead’s “A Moon Shaped Pool” also made a huge impression on me this year. As for video game and film music, I mostly listen to Japanese composers like Joe Hisaishi and Masashi Hamauzu. When I’m out of inspiration, I try to get out of my comfort zone and experiment with new things in life. I If I stay all day in my basement playing the piano and listening to video...